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Senior Center Launches Fund Drive
CT 01/23/17

CAPTION: Several community and organization members spoke during an open house Friday which officially marked the start of the fund drive. From left: Livingston County Commissioner Ed Douglas, Chillicothe Mayor Chuck Haney, Ron Wilder (serving as moderator for the open house and representing the Grand River Historical Society), Center Administrator Cindy Ireland; and Pam Brobst and E.L. Reed (representing Livingston County Community Foundation). To date, $140,000 has been raised through other donations, memorials and gifts.


C-T Photo / Catherine Stortz Ripley

A countywide fund drive got its official start Friday, January 20, 2017, to raise money to pay for the recent purchase of the Grand River Multipurpose Center, located at 607West Old Highway 36, and related improvements. The goal for the drive is $400,000, an amount that would ensure the center's continued operation for the next 10 to 15 years. The long-term plan is to erect a new facility at a location still to be determined at a time when increased demand overloads the building. Money raised through the fund drive will also be used to repair the parking lot, purchase air conditioning units and develop a reserve for operating cost and unexpected expenses.

Ron Wilder served as moderator of an open house Friday afternoon and gave the crowd of approximately 150 people an outline of the progress and plans for the fund drive and introduced attending members of the board of the Building Committee, the Center Advisory Committee and the Concerned Citizens for Chillicothe, all of whom have a role in the activities of the center.

Since moving to the site in 2010, the center has doubled its number of meals served to more than 40,000 in fiscal year 2015-16, 22,000 at the center and 18,500 home delivered. In addition, the center offers many activities, including exercise classes, line and square dancing, adult coloring, jigsaw puzzles, Medicare Part D comparisons, flu shots by the Livingston County Health Department, blood count checks by Hedrick Medical Center and many others.

Chillicothe Mayor Chuck Haney also addressed the group and voiced support from the city government and thanked the center for the job it was doing to improve the lives of Chillicothe senior citizens. He mentioned the progressive attitude of the city's population and how they supported local activities using as an example the Grand River Area Family YMCA that many people felt would never succeed in a town the size of Chillicothe. Not only was a YMCA constructed, but the building underwent expansions and the YMCA now has satellite facilities in Brookfield and Carrollton. Haney said the community is a "can-do" community. He also noted the successful community campaign in Wheeling to raise $300,000 for a community center. "Go out and be supportive, talk positive and work together and it will get done," Haney said.

Pam Brobst, president of the Livingston County Community Foundation, presented a check to Cindy Ireland, the center administrator, in the amount of $10,000 for the building fund. In making the presentation, Brobst stated that the senior center is important. "We feel like it is a good investment in reaching the lives of seniors for years to come," she said. "We want to thank you for everything you do for our community and our schools. We really do appreciate it."

Ron Wilder also announced a gift of $500 from the Grand River Historical Society Board.

Livingston County Presiding Commissioner Ed Douglas noted some of the services offered by the senior center. "The center has a terrific purpose to promote the health and wellness and life enrichment for seniors in the city and Livingston County," Douglas said.

To contribute to the fund drive, call the center at 660-646-1555 to obtain a donation form or mail a check to Grand River Multi-Purpose Center, P.O. Box 312, Chillicothe, MO 64601. Checks should be made payable to CCC Building Fund with GRMPC Building Fund in the "for" section in the lower left hand corner. The center operates under the 501(c3) nonprofit tax exempt corporation number of the Concerned Citizens of the Community which means that donations will be income tax exempt.


C-T Photo / Catherine Stortz Ripley

CAPTION: Newspaper clippings fill scrapbooks and are displayed on a table during the open house of the Grand River Multi-Purpose Center Friday afternoon.

Grand River Multi-Purpose Center to Start Raising Funds to Buy Building
By BRITTANY TUTT, C-T
February 11, 2015

See Related Article > > Senior Citizens Group Dissolves, March 8, 2016

CAPTION: The Grand River Multi-Purpose Center holds numerous activities for senior citizens that keep them social and active. The center hosts a dance two Fridays every month. This past Friday, there was a live band performing at the dance and many hit the dance floor and enjoyed themselves.


CT Photo / Brittany Tutt

The Grand River Multi-Purpose Center has been in operation since 1974 and has become a fixture of the community. GRMPC was called "The Senior Center" until its move from the RSVP office to its current location at 607 W. Business Highway 36 (near Taco Bell, China Garden and the former Wal-Mart store) in 2010. When GRMPC made the move, officials signed a 5-year lease, and according to the the center's administrator, Cindy Ireland, the lease will be up in May. Ireland said they need to buy the building and fund-raising efforts will be starting in March. Roughly $300,000 will be needed for the purchase; however, price and fund-raising specifics will be discussed at a meeting tomorrow night (Thursday) headed by the Concerned Citizens for the Community Board.

GRMPC has become a popular place for elders to gather and engage in numerous activities together. There are daily exercise classes at 9:30 a.m., line dance classes on Tuesdays at 1 p.m., bridge lessons on Tuesdays at 1 p.m., Friday night dances, card parties, Bingo held twice a month, computers with internet access, Memories in the Making (Alzheimer's Painters) on Wednesdays at 10 a.m., Stroke of the Brush (painting group) Mondays at 1 p.m., Internet Cafe and library / book exchange, pitch parties twice a year, a homemade pie raffle held every Friday at lunch, karaoke, gift corner and jigsaw puzzles available. There is also a pool table, treadmill, card games and board games for seniors to utilize.

Not only does GRMPC provide entertainment and fun for senior citizens, it provides a lot of useful services for them as well. Some of the center's services available to persons of 60 years of age or older are: blood pressure and blood sugar checks performed by health professionals on Mondays before lunch, free legal advice through the Missouri Senior's Legal helpline, assistance with Medicare Part D, income tax preparation, Drug Take Back Program, AARP Tax-Aide Program, AARP Safe Driving Course, Rehabilitation Services for the Blind and flu and tetanus shots periodically throughout the year. There are also meeting rooms available that are oftentimes utilized by groups, such as, Kiwanis, Red Hatters, American Legion Women's Auxiliary, Bridge Players, RSVP, OATS, Concerned Citizens for the Community, Advisory Council, Livingston County Foundation Council, Chapter T of the PEO, an PAR (Provide a Ride).

One of the most utilized and important services the center has available is the meal offerings for senior citizens. The center has been offering congregate meals daily Monday through Friday since its start in 1974. According to Ireland, they serve an average of 100 senior citizens at lunch each day. During the fiscal year of 2014 (July 1, 2013 through June 30, 2014) they served 20,260 meals inside GRMPC. These hot meals are prepared in an approved kitchen, meeting USDA requirements. They are free to persons 60 years old or older and that senior citizen's spouse no matter their age. Persons under the age of 60 can eat as well but will be required to pay full price ($6.35). Though the meal is free to seniors, voluntary donations are accepted.

Also, in addition to free hot lunches inside the building, the center also offers free daily home-delivered meals Monday through Friday to individuals who are homebound. The home delivered meals program began in 1993. In fiscal year 2014, the center served 5,098 hot meals and 823 frozen meals. There were 2,779 frozen meals delivered to Medicaid clients and 3,960 hot meals were delivered to Medicaid clients as well. These delivered meals are prepared and packaged daily by the center's kitchen and are special diet friendly meals. They are delivered by volunteers. GRMPC home delivered meals' service area is Livingston County. They currently deliver to about 50 clients within the Chillicothe city limits and three clients in rural areas of Ludlow, Dawn and Utica daily. GRMPC can deliver meals to anyone in Livingston County that meet the criteria required (such as being 60 years of age and being homebound). There are currently 27 volunteer home delivery drivers, 12 kitchen volunteers and nine front desk volunteers who rotate shifts to accomplish this service. The Nutrition Center helped serve 32,920 meals in the 2014 fiscal year to senior citizens.

There are about 60 volunteers at GRMPC total that keep the organization in operation. The GRMPC has four full-time paid employees and one part-time paid employee. According to Ireland, GRMPC's three main focuses are providing basic needs, health and wellness and life enrichment to senior citizens. "The center provides senior citizens with hot, nutritious meals and a way for them to stay social and active," she said. Mary Seidel, Lois Clark and Connie Huntsman have been going to the Center for about 7 seven years and absolutely love it. "This place is just awesome," Huntsman said. She organizes the Friday night dances for GRMPC. "We have gotten so many programs since Cindy came in here. She really cares about this place and is always concerned for us." Seidel said her favorite activity at the Center is the exercise class held daily. "I'm glad I get to enjoy the center for free," she said. Clark's favorite part of the Center is the new library, which she has operated for almost a year. Clark said their library has received a lot of donations of books, and many seniors are excited about reading them. "So many like to read but not everyone can afford to buy books, so it's exciting to give people a way to read for free," she said. All three ladies agreed that the center is important to senior citizens because it keeps them social and active. "It's especially important to those who don't have family," Clark said. They said the center is like a family away from family. Everyone knows everyone and if someone is not there one day, they will check on him or her; and, if someone is sick they send cards, the ladies said. Clark also mentioned that when she had knee surgery, the home delivered meals were a life-saver for her and they were "delicious," she said.

Along with all the activities that enrich these seniors' lives, the most vital thing the center offers is a place to meet and socialize Seidel said. "If you stay home, you can sit and stare at a wall and go crazy," she said. "Here, you're able to visit and stay social."

The center now operates under the umbrella of the Concerned Citizens for the Community Inc. Board, which allows them to be considered a non-profit organization and be Tax Exempt. If you'd like to donate to GRMPC, call 660-646-1555 for details.

Senior Center Volunteers Deliver Hot Meals to Home Bound Seniors
By BRITTANY TUTT CT
March 31, 2015

The Grand River Multi-Purpose Center has been in operation since 1974 and is a popular place for senior citizens to gather and engage in numerous activities together including dances, exercise classes, bingo and much more. One of the most utilized and important services the center has available are the meal offerings for senior citizens. The center offers both meals at the center and home delivered meals for those who are home bound. The center's Nutrition Center helped serve 32,920 meals in the 2014 fiscal year to senior citizens. The center has been offering congregate meals daily at the center Monday through Friday since its start in 1974. According to Cindy Ireland, the center's administrator, they serve an average of 100 senior citizens at lunch each day and during the fiscal year of 2014 (July 1, 2013 through June 30, 2014), they served 20,260 meals inside the center. In addition to free hot lunches inside the building, the center also offers daily home-delivered meals Monday through Friday to individuals who are homebound.

The home delivered meals program began in 1993. In fiscal year 2014, the center served 5,098 hot meals and 823 frozen meals. There were 2,779 frozen meals delivered to Medicaid clients and 3,960 hot meals were delivered to Medicaid clients as well. These delivered meals are prepared and packaged daily by the center's kitchen and are special diet friendly meals. The meals are prepared in an approved kitchen, meeting USDA requirements, and they are delivered by volunteers.

There are currently 60 volunteers that make it possible for this home delivery meal program to happen. Ireland said some drivers deliver meals once a week, some deliver everyday and others fill in when needed. However, there are always four routes to go on every work day and each driver gets a route. Home delivered meals are ready for drivers to pick up at around 10:30 a.m. so the kitchen help can have the hot lunch at the center prepared and ready by 11:30 a.m. Delivery takes about an hour for each driver. Hot meals are put into containers to keep them warm. Items that don't need kept warm, such as, milk, salad, dessert etc are put into brown bags with the individual's name on them. They put the person's name on the bag because a lot of the time people will ask for substitutes, such as, a diabetic dessert or skim milk instead of two percent. Frozen meals are also delivered for people who need their dinner provided as well.

Two people that deliver meals to senior citizens every week are Judy Shaffer and Ron Wilder. Shaffer has delivered meals for over 20 years, and Wilder has delivers meals for about 5. Shaffer delivers every Thursday to about 14 people. However, she said that number always varies. Shaffer remembers when the home delivered meal program first started, there was one driver for everyday. However, that number has increased significantly since then. She said the best part of delivering meals is "the people." Wilder agreed with Shaffer about the people being the best part of the process. "A lot of those people don't have visitors during the day. Sometimes you're the only person they see outside of the house. The vast majority are happy to see you and you can tell the appreciate what you do," Wilder said. Wilder also delivers meals once a week and he delivers to about 10 to 12 houses. Though the people are the best part of delivering for Shaffer and Wilder, losing the people is the worst part of delivering. Shaffer said the meal programs at the senior center are the best programs the center has because some wouldn't get a hot nutritious meal without them.

The meals served at the center at 11:30 a.m. are free to persons over 60 years of age and their spouse's meal is also free no matter the age. Though the meal is free to seniors, voluntary donations are accepted. Persons under the age of 60 can eat as well but will be required to pay full price ($6.35). The center's home delivered meal service area is Livingston County. They currently deliver to about 50 clients within the Chillicothe city limits and three clients in rural areas of Ludlow, Dawn and Utica daily. The center can deliver meals to anyone in Livingston County that meets the criteria required (such as being 60 years of age and being homebound). Ireland will make home visits to those inquiring about home delivered meals and will interview them about their dietary needs. The home delivered meals are free, but the center suggests a voluntary four dollar donation for every meal. If interested in home bound meals, call the center at 660- 646-1555.

Senior Center Opens at New Location
July 27, 2010


CT photo/Laura Schuler

Seniors received their first look of the new Grand River Multi-Purpose center on Monday when the facility reopened after a week-long closure so the center could move from it's previous location on Locust Street to its current site at 607 West Business Route 36.

There were 98 lunches served during the noon hour, according to administrator Debbie Colton. She said the center will host a grand opening and ribbon cutting on August 20.

Senior Center Move
Constitution-Tribune, Monday, July 19, 2010

C-T Photo/Amanda McKay

Chillicothe National Guardsmen Brandon Stockwell and Heath Corzette assisted moving the large, heavy equipment from the old Senior Center on Locust Street this morning from the kitchen including buffet tables, an oven, a heavy duty mixer and much more. The items were then moved to the new facility in the old Aldi building in south Chillicothe.

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